This post is the 4th part in the series Arizona day trips written by Mitch Stevens from Southwest Discoveries.

hiking

It’s a well-known fact that Arizona is beautiful, often breathtakingly so. From the fascinating Sonoran Desert in the south to the red rock country near Sedona and the Grand Canyon, the state features a staggering diversity of landscapes, perfect for day trips and adventures

I’m Mitch Stevens, founder and lead guide for Southwest Discoveries, a hiking and adventure company based in Tucson. Born and raised in New York City, I came to discover the great outdoors and fall in love with Arizona’s special places. A couple of my favorites include Rogers Canyon and the Nankoweap Trail in the Grand Canyon. They are wonderfully secluded and stunning hikes in the southwest!

Nankoweap - Fred and the canyon_000

Rogers Canyon – Spirits of the Past in the Superstition Wilderness

Elisha Reavis dreamt of living live off the land in a beautiful place far away from the hordes of humanity. He realized that when he moved to a high mountain valley in Arizona’s Superstition Mountains, where he farmed, grazed and tendered an orchard. Ponderosa pines graced his ranch and a beautiful clear spring-fed creek watered the fruit trees he planted.

Five hundred years before Reavis arrived, the Salado peoples were eking out a living in Rogers Canyon and today, their fascinating cliff dwellings are visible from a hike just a few miles the Rogers Canyon trail junction.

Gradually, as we walked left from the junction, the landscape transformed from high desert grassland to riparian. There were huge, old sycamore trees, juniper, oak and mountain laurel. As we ventured deeper into the thick of Rogers Canyon, spectacular volcanic rock formations appeared. Different shapes seemed to be chiseled by the elements: a teapot, Queen Victoria’s crown. An immense boulder was perched precariously high up on the canyon wall.

We arrived at the Salado cliff dwellings. These well preserved ruins, constructed over 600 years ago and located in a huge cave above the canyon floor, were the highlight of our day. At one time, as many as 100 people lived there in more than 65 rooms. when it was constructed over 600 years ago. Most of the ruins have all but vanished but there is still a lot to see. Even from the ruins, across the canyon was a sight to behold. Impressive spires of volcanic rock, glowing in late afternoon sun and studded with trees and shrubs, appeared to march up the opposite canyon wall. The entire scene was framed by buff colored rocks comprising the cavern itself.
Because the ruins are fragile and irreplaceable; the forest service asks that hikers tread lightly and respect this magnificent place.

Rogers Canyon - cliffhouse view

Adventuring at Nankoweap

For hikers wanting to experience raw adventure and avoid crowds, the Nankoweap trail at the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is one of the most enjoyable and epic treks in the southwest. Spectacular geology and out- of- this world views are the calling cards of this magnificent place.
The trail was originally constructed in 1882 by Major John Wesley Powell, the one- armed civil war veteran and explorer who is credited with leading the first group of men down the Colorado River and through the present day Grand Canyon in 1871. The trail was created so that Charles Doolittle Walcott, a geologist in the Powell party, could easily access the canyon and study its rock layers.
The first three miles of the Nankoweap Trail are a delightful romp through a high elevation forest of ponderosa pine, juniper and aspen. Then almost suddenly, the trail takes on an entirely different character as it plunges off the rim of the Grand Canyon to continue along a ridge-top. Arriving at Marion Point, we came right into contact with the geology that makes this part of the Grand Canyon so incredible and unique. The rock layers’ date as far back 300 million to 750 million years ago. rock layers reached far back into our planet’s past from 300 million to 750 million years ago.

Unbelievable panoramas unfold from that point. The visible green ribbon along Nankoweap Creek lies 2,500 feet below and the forks of the creek extend far back toward the plateau, each separated by colorful rocky ridges and lofty buttes. The most striking of these is Mt. Hayden, a distinct and slender 400 foot Coconino sandstone spire at an elevation of over 8,000 feet.

Should the Grand Canyon be included on your bucket list? Most certainly. The spectacular and uncrowded Nankoweap trail is one of the best ways to experience the raw and unspoiled grandeur of this most magnificent gorge, one of the seven natural wonders of the world.
When you experience these awesome hikes in Arizona, not only will the splendors of the Sonoran Desert take front and center but the jaw dropping beauty of the Grand Canyon will cast its spell. These tree majestic places showcase some of the best the southwest has to offer.

Thank you for visiting. If you liked this post you might want to have a look at the others in the series here and here and here.

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